From the Archives: Aiming to Please

After a long, hot day of practice at the University of Florida, Steve Spurrier is the first one off the field. He has made it his custom to lead the way into the press barrage. Spurrier steps to the sidelines and is assaulted with television cameras and tape recorders. "Nothin' too exciting happened today, nothin' too disappointing happened," he reported one afternoon early in the season, "just another day out in the sunshine. What else y'all wanna know?"

From the Archives: Heart of the Rockies

"I try to be myself and let my teammates know where I stand in my relationship with the Lord. But at the same time, I don't want them to feel like I'm trying to beat them over the head. I hope to be their friend and build a relationship with them and let them know that I'm there for them. I feel like if I build relationships and prepare my heart for a chance to share with others, God will use me in a way that will glorify Him." -Matt Holliday, 2008 March/April issue of Sports Spectrum "When your superstar status type guys are successful in what they do, some of the non-believers on the team can see that you can be a Christian and still be aggressive in the baseball realm and be a good baseball player. To have the key leaders on a team be believers, and for them to live a certain way is significant." -Jeremy Affeldt, 2008 March/April issue of Sports Spectrum Click HERE to read our archived story on Matt Holliday and Jeremy Affeldt from when they played for the Colorado Rockies.

From the Archives: Going Long

Socks -- (according to Webster's dictionary) a woven covering for the feet. Socks -- (according to Seattle Seahawks opponents) something you don't want to be faked out of when you're attempting to cover Steve Largent. Put Steve Largent in a footrace with other wide receivers like Olympic sprinter Ron Brown of the Los Angeles Rams and Willia Gault of the Chicago Bears, and Largent's speed makes him look like a Volkswagen among Ferraris… Click HERE to read the remainder of this "From the Archives" story on Steve Largent from an issue in 1987 when Sports Spectrum was called Second Look. This year, Sports Spectrum is celebrating 30 years of covering faith and sports.

From the Archives: 100 Percent

Former NFL linebacker Derrick Brooks is now in the Hall of Fame. Here is a throwback story when he was featured on the cover of Sports Spectrum's Winter 2009 issue. The glass atrium of the Tampa Bay Buccaneers' posh headquarters is adorned with exhibits commemorating the history of the franchise.The most striking is a statue featuring life-sized images of coach Jon Gruden and eight standout players reveling in their 48-21 victory against the Oakland Raiders in Super Bowl XXXVII. Among the sculpted figures is one of Derrick Brooks, whose character off the football field is symbolized in a less conspicuous... Click here to finish reading Sports Spectrum's throwback feature on Derrick Brooks from five years ago.

An American Revolution

As soon as he crossed the Atlantic Ocean, Tim Howard began to open people's eyes. Here was an American goalie playing at the top level in soccer-crazy England. The 25-year-old Howard, who spent nearly six seasons with the New York/New Jersey MetroStars, signed with Manchester United of England's Premier League last July, and he made an immediate impact upon reaching the United Kingdom. In fact, Howard helped Man U capture the coveted FA Cup on May 22 by shutting out Millwall 3-0 in the deciding game... Click here to read the remainder of this throwback story on Tim Howard from Sports Spectrum's July/August 2004 issue…

Chronicling the Spiritual Journey of 1999 U.S. Open Champion Payne Stewart

The putt only covered 15 feet, but it seemed more like 100 to the gallery gathered at the eighteenth hole at Pinehurst No. 2 on that early Sunday evening in June 1999. It traveled uphill, broke ever so slightly to the right...and slipped gently into the cup. Payne Stewart, wearing his trademark knickers and argyle socks, hoisted the ball up to the heavens. The crowd roared. And for the second time in his career, Stewart was crowned champion of the U.S. Open--the most prestigious event for American golfers. The victory would be his last on the PGA Tour. Four months later, on October 25, 1999, Payne Stewart entered the gates of heaven after his private jet plowed into a dirt field in Minot, South Dakota, taking the lives of Stewart and three business associates. His death at only 42 years old shook the golf world and the entire nation...

Randy Johnson, Big Man in Seattle

Randy Johnson. Just the mention of his name elicits a collection of defeated, almost fearful responses from major league hitters. Some shake their head and laugh nervously. Others ponder their fate for a moment...then shrug their shoulders in resignation. Still others take a deep breath and slowly exhale as if they've narrowly escaped death. Remember the 1993 All-Star Game? The always colorful, left-handed hitting John Kruk stepped in to face Johnson. The 6-foot-10 inch southpaw promptly sailed a fastball over the first baseman's head. That's all Kruk needed. He was finished. He was transformed into a wide-eyed little leaguer batting for the first time as he bailed...

A look back at Hoosiers star and UCLA head coach Steve Alford

Yawn...yawn. Seemingly just another day at the office for point guard Steve Alford. The smooth 6-foot-2 senior led Indiana University to the National Collegiate Athletic Association basketball championship this season, averaging 22 points a game. But his fluid movements on the floor belie the effort and diligence away from the camera that went into his contributions toward the team's national title. Alford ended his career as the Hoosiers' four-time Most Valuable Player. He finished as the number 2 all-time scorer in the Big 10 Conference--a mere deuce behind Michigan's Mike McGee... To read our story on Hoosiers star and recently-named UCLA head coach Steve Alford from our Volume 1, Number 3 issue, click here.

From the Archives — New York Times

Familiar words to a Frank Sinatra song became reality for Joe and Kim Girardi on a November day in 1996. After three years behind the plate for the Colorado Rockies, Girardi left the Mile-High City in a trade that sent him east to don the Yankee pinstripes. The Girardis had no idea what was ahead, but with excitement and a bit of anxiety they changed the message on their answering machine to greet callers with, "It's up to you, New York, New York." "I was in a comfort zone in Colorado," says Girardi. "Getting traded was a faith-builder, and as the season progressed I began to see what God was doing in our lives." This archived story was published in the May 1997 issue of Sports Spectrum magazine. Click here to read the rest of the story

From the Archives — A Comeback in the Long Run

For even the world's best athletes, the Olympics represent the chance of a lifetime. Years of sacrifice and training culminate in fleeting minutes, perhaps only seconds, of effort. And then…only one winner stands atop the award platform. Going for the gold is one thing. Getting it is another. Just ask Jim Ryun. Though not one, not two, but three Olympiads, he chased the gold. But every time he ran, its glitter remained just beyond his grasp… Click here to read the remainder of Jim Ryun's story in the Vol. 3, No. 2 (1989) issue of Sports Spectrum, which was then called Second Look.

From the Archives — Starting Over

Below are segments of Sports Spectrum's interview with Mark Jackson from our February 1995 issue. SS: How have you changed since your college days at St. John's? Has being an NBA star affected you? Jackson: No, I think the things that have changed me are being married, having two children, and most important, becoming a Christian. That changed my life more than anything else. That changed my perspective, changed my attitude, changed my whole outlook, and that really was the greatest thing that happened to me...

From the Archives — Striking Back

The last time we had a Detroit Tiger on our cover was Travis Fryman in our May 1996 issue. Read his story below... Travis Fryman's dream had come true. He found himself in the visitor's clubhouse at Fenway Park--covered with ketchup, mustard, and every other condiment that could be rustled up from Fenway concession stands. Some wise guy had come up with two eggs that were added to the mix, along with some Coke and cold coffee. Yellow ooze was dripping from Fryman's hair and into his eyebrows. This was the fulfillment of a dream? Click here to read the remainder of Travis Fryman's story.

From the Archives — Center Stage

Carlos Beltran: "I really believe we can do everything in the name of Jesus Christ. The way I see it, everything that we do is for God. In our life, there is nothing as important as Him. The only thing that really matters is our faith. I feel He put me here for a reason. Every time I take the field, I tell Him, 'I'm doing this in Your name.' When I want to accomplish things I feel like I can. But it's not for myself, but for Him and His glory." This story on Carlos Beltran was published in the July/August 2005 issue of Sports Spectrum magazine. Click here to read the remainder of the story.

From the Archives — What Drives David Carr?

A decade ago, we featured David Carr, the No. 1 draft pick in the 2002 NFL Draft, on the cover of our magazine. This week, we released our August 2013 DigiMag, which features David's younger brother, Fresno State University quarterback Derek Carr, on the cover. It's the first time two brothers have graced the cover of Sports Spectrum in its 30-year history. Here is a look back at the January/February 2003 cover story on David Carr... You look at David Carr and you see a star in the making. You see a 23-year-old man with chiseled good looks that have put him in a GQ pictorial. You see a blossoming Houston Texans quarterback with a 7-year contract worth $46.2 million...

From the Archives — Covered

In a controversial season for Alex Rodriguez because of his involvement in the Biogenesis case and his appeal to Major League Baseball, we dug up this story from our Summer 2009 issue about A-Rod's teammate Andy Pettitte. Pettitte admitted in 2008 to using performance enhancing drugs; and his road to confession, forgiveness and redemption is chronicled in today's archived story. Read more here.

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