Randy Johnson, Big Man in Seattle

Randy Johnson. Just the mention of his name elicits a collection of defeated, almost fearful responses from major league hitters. Some shake their head and laugh nervously. Others ponder their fate for a moment...then shrug their shoulders in resignation. Still others take a deep breath and slowly exhale as if they've narrowly escaped death. Remember the 1993 All-Star Game? The always colorful, left-handed hitting John Kruk stepped in to face Johnson. The 6-foot-10 inch southpaw promptly sailed a fastball over the first baseman's head. That's all Kruk needed. He was finished. He was transformed into a wide-eyed little leaguer batting for the first time as he bailed...

A look back at Hoosiers star and UCLA head coach Steve Alford

Yawn...yawn. Seemingly just another day at the office for point guard Steve Alford. The smooth 6-foot-2 senior led Indiana University to the National Collegiate Athletic Association basketball championship this season, averaging 22 points a game. But his fluid movements on the floor belie the effort and diligence away from the camera that went into his contributions toward the team's national title. Alford ended his career as the Hoosiers' four-time Most Valuable Player. He finished as the number 2 all-time scorer in the Big 10 Conference--a mere deuce behind Michigan's Mike McGee... To read our story on Hoosiers star and recently-named UCLA head coach Steve Alford from our Volume 1, Number 3 issue, click here.

From the Archives — New York Times

Familiar words to a Frank Sinatra song became reality for Joe and Kim Girardi on a November day in 1996. After three years behind the plate for the Colorado Rockies, Girardi left the Mile-High City in a trade that sent him east to don the Yankee pinstripes. The Girardis had no idea what was ahead, but with excitement and a bit of anxiety they changed the message on their answering machine to greet callers with, "It's up to you, New York, New York." "I was in a comfort zone in Colorado," says Girardi. "Getting traded was a faith-builder, and as the season progressed I began to see what God was doing in our lives." This archived story was published in the May 1997 issue of Sports Spectrum magazine. Click here to read the rest of the story

From the Archives — A Comeback in the Long Run

For even the world's best athletes, the Olympics represent the chance of a lifetime. Years of sacrifice and training culminate in fleeting minutes, perhaps only seconds, of effort. And then…only one winner stands atop the award platform. Going for the gold is one thing. Getting it is another. Just ask Jim Ryun. Though not one, not two, but three Olympiads, he chased the gold. But every time he ran, its glitter remained just beyond his grasp… Click here to read the remainder of Jim Ryun's story in the Vol. 3, No. 2 (1989) issue of Sports Spectrum, which was then called Second Look.

From the Archives — Starting Over

Below are segments of Sports Spectrum's interview with Mark Jackson from our February 1995 issue. SS: How have you changed since your college days at St. John's? Has being an NBA star affected you? Jackson: No, I think the things that have changed me are being married, having two children, and most important, becoming a Christian. That changed my life more than anything else. That changed my perspective, changed my attitude, changed my whole outlook, and that really was the greatest thing that happened to me...

From the Archives — Striking Back

The last time we had a Detroit Tiger on our cover was Travis Fryman in our May 1996 issue. Read his story below... Travis Fryman's dream had come true. He found himself in the visitor's clubhouse at Fenway Park--covered with ketchup, mustard, and every other condiment that could be rustled up from Fenway concession stands. Some wise guy had come up with two eggs that were added to the mix, along with some Coke and cold coffee. Yellow ooze was dripping from Fryman's hair and into his eyebrows. This was the fulfillment of a dream? Click here to read the remainder of Travis Fryman's story.

From the Archives — Center Stage

Carlos Beltran: "I really believe we can do everything in the name of Jesus Christ. The way I see it, everything that we do is for God. In our life, there is nothing as important as Him. The only thing that really matters is our faith. I feel He put me here for a reason. Every time I take the field, I tell Him, 'I'm doing this in Your name.' When I want to accomplish things I feel like I can. But it's not for myself, but for Him and His glory." This story on Carlos Beltran was published in the July/August 2005 issue of Sports Spectrum magazine. Click here to read the remainder of the story.

From the Archives — What Drives David Carr?

A decade ago, we featured David Carr, the No. 1 draft pick in the 2002 NFL Draft, on the cover of our magazine. This week, we released our August 2013 DigiMag, which features David's younger brother, Fresno State University quarterback Derek Carr, on the cover. It's the first time two brothers have graced the cover of Sports Spectrum in its 30-year history. Here is a look back at the January/February 2003 cover story on David Carr... You look at David Carr and you see a star in the making. You see a 23-year-old man with chiseled good looks that have put him in a GQ pictorial. You see a blossoming Houston Texans quarterback with a 7-year contract worth $46.2 million...

From the Archives — Covered

In a controversial season for Alex Rodriguez because of his involvement in the Biogenesis case and his appeal to Major League Baseball, we dug up this story from our Summer 2009 issue about A-Rod's teammate Andy Pettitte. Pettitte admitted in 2008 to using performance enhancing drugs; and his road to confession, forgiveness and redemption is chronicled in today's archived story. Read more here.

From the Archives — The Power of Positive Sinking

It's the fifth inning at Royals Stadium. In the bullpen, Dan Quisenberry, the American League's premier relief pitcher, has been cracking jokes, planning pranks and maybe working a crossword puzzle. He's even wandered under the stands to consult with groundskeeper George Toma on the best way to strike out the crab grass in Quiz's front yard. Dan admits to not thinking about the game away from the ballpark, and not much about it at all during the first five innings either. But now he's getting restless... Click here to read our feature on Dan Quisenberry from our May/June 1985 issue. Quisenberry was one of the first athletes to grace the cover of Sports Spectrum magazine, which was originally called Sports Focus. Quisenberry passed away in September of 1998.

From the Archives — Masterful Performance

With a 5-under 66 in the first round of The Open Championship at Muirfield, Zach Johnson has put himself in early contention to win his second major championship. Read our "From the Archives" story on Johnson after he won his first major in 2007... For many golf fans, the final round of the Masters Tournament in Augusta, Georgia, is the high holy day of professional sports. It's a chance to worship all things green and beautiful in the aptly named Cathedral of Golf. But for 2007 champion Zach Johnson, his stunning victory on April 8, was a chance to win the most prestigious of golf tournaments, the Masters, while worshiping the true Master... Click here to read the rest of our story on Zach Johnson from our July/August 2007 issue.

From the Archives — The Smut Stops Here

It takes guts to man the line of scrimmage, face mask to face mask with some of the nastiest 300-pound plus defensive linemen in the National Football League. (Of course, it's not so bad when you're 6-foot-6 and 278 pounds yourself.) It also takes guts to stand up for your convictions -- especially when you risk being misunderstood. Give Anthony Munoz an "A" for intestinal fortitude on both counts. The Cincinnati Bengals offensive tackle has been voted to the Pro Bowl seven times and has been recognized twice as the NFL's best offensive lineman. The 30-year-old Munoz has also developed the courage to take on moral issues. One that concerns him is the pervasiveness of pornography -- an issue he admits he has not always been sensitized toward...

From the Archives — Buck Williams

When 16th-century English theologian Richard Hooker said, "Change is not made without inconvenience, even from worse to better," he didn't know anything about NBA traders. But he did know something that Portland Trail Blazer forward Buck Williams has learned: The road to success is not always smooth. Sometimes it takes you through New Jersey. Kyle Rote Jr. caught up with the Blazers' veteran to ask him how change has affect his life. Click here to read our story on the third pick in the 1981 draft, Buck Williams, from our March/April 1991 issue.

From the Archives — Giant Ambassador

Dikembe Mutombo is a giant among men. At 7 feet 2 inches, the former Houston Rockets center towered above a majority of other players in the NBA. Regarded as one of the most prolific defensive players of all time, Mutombo has won the NBA Defensive Player of the Year Award four times, and in 2007 he surpassed Kareem Abdul-Jabbar as the second most prolific shot blocker in NBA history, behind Hakeem Olajuwon. Where the basketball superstar stands out most, however, is in the area of philanthropy. Called the “NBA's tallest humanitarian” by the New York Daily News, Mutombo has a heart as big as he is tall; a heart that reaches across the Atlantic Ocean to his homeland of Africa, the poorest continent in the world...

From the Archives — The Power Forward Is On

In only his fourth NBA season, A.C. Green has become the Los Angeles Lakers' leading rebounder. Although small for a power forward, A.C. is an iron man in the lane. He has endured on some of the toughest turf in sports, appearing in every regular season contest but three during his first three campaigns. A.C. (whose initials stand for the letters A and C) talks with Kyle Rote Jr. about crashing the boards with the big boys. KYLE: Let's talk about the toughness of the game itself. A lot of people have believed for many years that playing basketball in the NBA is physically the toughest of any of the professional sports. A.C.: That's true in that it's really demanding on your body. And it's pretty obvious to anyone who might watch... Read the rest of the story here.
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