From the Archives — The Smut Stops Here

It takes guts to man the line of scrimmage, face mask to face mask with some of the nastiest 300-pound plus defensive linemen in the National Football League. (Of course, it's not so bad when you're 6-foot-6 and 278 pounds yourself.) It also takes guts to stand up for your convictions -- especially when you risk being misunderstood. Give Anthony Munoz an "A" for intestinal fortitude on both counts. The Cincinnati Bengals offensive tackle has been voted to the Pro Bowl seven times and has been recognized twice as the NFL's best offensive lineman. The 30-year-old Munoz has also developed the courage to take on moral issues. One that concerns him is the pervasiveness of pornography -- an issue he admits he has not always been sensitized toward...

From the Archives — Buck Williams

When 16th-century English theologian Richard Hooker said, "Change is not made without inconvenience, even from worse to better," he didn't know anything about NBA traders. But he did know something that Portland Trail Blazer forward Buck Williams has learned: The road to success is not always smooth. Sometimes it takes you through New Jersey. Kyle Rote Jr. caught up with the Blazers' veteran to ask him how change has affect his life. Click here to read our story on the third pick in the 1981 draft, Buck Williams, from our March/April 1991 issue.

From the Archives — Giant Ambassador

Dikembe Mutombo is a giant among men. At 7 feet 2 inches, the former Houston Rockets center towered above a majority of other players in the NBA. Regarded as one of the most prolific defensive players of all time, Mutombo has won the NBA Defensive Player of the Year Award four times, and in 2007 he surpassed Kareem Abdul-Jabbar as the second most prolific shot blocker in NBA history, behind Hakeem Olajuwon. Where the basketball superstar stands out most, however, is in the area of philanthropy. Called the “NBA's tallest humanitarian” by the New York Daily News, Mutombo has a heart as big as he is tall; a heart that reaches across the Atlantic Ocean to his homeland of Africa, the poorest continent in the world...

From the Archives — The Power Forward Is On

In only his fourth NBA season, A.C. Green has become the Los Angeles Lakers' leading rebounder. Although small for a power forward, A.C. is an iron man in the lane. He has endured on some of the toughest turf in sports, appearing in every regular season contest but three during his first three campaigns. A.C. (whose initials stand for the letters A and C) talks with Kyle Rote Jr. about crashing the boards with the big boys. KYLE: Let's talk about the toughness of the game itself. A lot of people have believed for many years that playing basketball in the NBA is physically the toughest of any of the professional sports. A.C.: That's true in that it's really demanding on your body. And it's pretty obvious to anyone who might watch... Read the rest of the story here.

From the Archives — The Mize Guys: Chipping In From the Rough

Imagine having a job in which you get paid only if you do better than most of your fellow workers. And some weeks when you show up for work, your superiors make you try out just to see if you can even work that week. That's something like the high-pressure world of the professional golfers tour, where nothing is given to you free and the rewards are there only for those who can persevere. Kyle Rote Jr. Talks with PGA golfer Larry Mize to find out how he survives on tour... Mize won the Masters in 1987, when he chipped in from off the green at the 11th hole at Augusta in a playoff to win his only major title. Click here to read Sports Spectrum's interview with Mize from its January-February 1991 issue.

From the Archives — The Sixth Man

Let's go back to 1988. To the suburban community of Lake Bluff, Illinois, home of Lake Forest High School. Rob Pelinka is nearing the end of an outstanding prep basketball career. As a senior, the 6-foot, 6-inch guard is averaging 30 points and nearly 10 rebounds per game. Recruiters from around the country are knocking on his door, offering their championship promises on a daily basis. Coaches from Arizona, Stanford, Illinois, and Michigan are regulars at the Pelinka residence. That's not to mention the letters of interest from perennial basketball powerhouses North Carolina and Duke... Click here to read our 1993 feature on Rob Pelinka, who was the sixth man for the University of Michigan under the Fab Five and now represents NBA superstar Kobe Bryant.

From the Archives — John Wooden, his legacy, and his top five “Woodenisms”

Simply the best. John Wooden is, without question, the most successful, most respected, most everything collegiate basketball coach in the universe. Wooden passed away at age 99 on June 4, 2010, about fourth months from his 100th birthday...

Roger Staubach – Faithful Leader

Roger Thomas Staubach. Winner. What more can you say? Here’s a guy who had only one losing season in his lifetime. From Cincinnati’s Purcell High School to the New Mexico Military Institute to the Naval Academy to the Dallas Cowboys – his only sub .500 season was when injuries sank his senior season at Navy. And his winning percentage in the pros was a wave-worthy .746...

From the Archives – George Foreman: Fighters No More

From fierce rivals, to great friends, George Foreman’s relationship with legendary boxer Muhammad Ali had a renewal when Foreman was transformed forever. You ask George Foreman about Muhammad Ali. What is their relationship like these days? Do they ever communicate? Foreman rifles through his cell phone and quickly retrieves a photo of Ali trying to call him. It was taken less than 24 hours earlier, on Father’s Day, by one of Ali’s daughters, Hana Ali. Muhammad was not able to connect with Foreman, so Hana and “Big George” traded text messages while “The Greatest” rested – something that’s imperative in order to counteract the draining, debilitating effects of Parkinson’s disease...

From the Archives – Drew Brees

New Orleans Saints Super Bowl MVP quarterback Drew Brees doesn’t possess the speed of a Michael Vick, the prototype frame of a Peyton Manning, or the arm strength of a Jay Cutler. “He’s not the biggest guy. He’s not the strongest, or the fastest,” said brother Reid Brees, who is two years younger than Drew. “But he’ll still find a way to beat you.” Therein lies what makes Brees special...

From the Archives – Kevin Durant

NBA superstar Kevin Durant and the Thunder came up short in the NBA Finals last year, but he has a promising future and leads a quiet life as he seeks to walk closer with the Lord. When Kevin Durant signed an extension with the Oklahoma City Thunder on July 7, 2010, he did so with virtually no fanfare save an understated, yet highly grateful message to the fans via Twitter. That extension was later revealed to be for five years and roughly $86 million...

From the Archives – Trent Dilfer

Trent Dilfer spent 13 years in the NFL and played on five different teams. He was a Pro Bowler (1997), a Super Bowl champion (XXXV), and Bart Starr Man of the Year Award winner (2002). Dilfer now spends his time as an NFL Analyst on ESPN. We ran this story on Dilfer back in the November 1998 issue of Sports Spectrum... It’s the third day of training camp. Trent Dilfer has just endured the day’s final two hours of practice in the Florida sun. He’s tired, the sun has scorched his head, and he misses his wife and two children, who are out of town. He doesn’t complain. You won’t hear him do that. His withered blue eyes tell the story. He smiles and looks sheepishly at a reporter as they sit in the University of Tampa cafeteria.

From the Archives – Dave Drevecky

Dave Dravecky was a Cinderella story – if Cinderella could have worn cleats to a ballgame instead of glass slippers to a royal ball. Sure athletes retire with every season, but America had followed the ups and downs of Dave’s career as closely as the sporting year’s many scandals and tragedies, though for an entirely different reason. Dave Dravecky had overcome cancer surgery on his throwing arm and come back to pitch again in the major leagues. Not since watching helplessly as Lou Gehrig battled amyotrophic lateral sclerosis had the nation so intimately identified with a ballplayer’s struggle with illness...

From the Archives – Andy Pettitte

Andy Pettitte and the New York Yankees have clinched yet another AL East title in 2012 and the once-retired Pettitte figures to factor into the Yankees postseason success one last time. Pettitte is the all-time leader in postseason wins with 19 and could be going for number 20 in Game 2 of the ALDS. Pettitte has always been a strong believer and family man, Here is our story on Andy from the May-June 2001 issue of Sports Spectrum. It was the perfect day for an all-star showcase. The best baseball players from the Houston area had been invited to show their stuff in front of college and professional scouts. But something was wrong. Where was the Pettitte boy?

From the Archives: 2004 World Champion Red Sox

Since it's almost MLB playoff time, we thought it would be good to visit the archives for our story about the 2004 World Champion Red Sox. In the story, we hear from ace Curt Schilling as he explains that Game 6 of the ALCS was about God, not a bloody sock. We also hear from the Red Sox reliever Mike Timlin and the chaplain of the Red Sox, Walt Day, who talked about the spiritual influence Dave Roberts had on the locker room...
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