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From The Archives

From The Archives

It's the fifth inning at Royals Stadium. In the bullpen, Dan Quisenberry, the American League's premier relief pitcher, has been cracking jokes, planning pranks and maybe working a crossword puzzle. He's even wandered under the stands to consult with groundskeeper George Toma on the best way to strike out the crab grass in Quiz's front yard. Dan admits to not thinking about the game away from the ballpark, and not much about it at all during the first five innings either. But now he's getting restless... Click here to read our feature on Dan Quisenberry from our May/June 1985 issue. Quisenberry was one of the first athletes to grace the cover of Sports Spectrum magazine, which was originally called Sports Focus. Quisenberry passed away in September of 1998.

With a 5-under 66 in the first round of The Open Championship at Muirfield, Zach Johnson has put himself in early contention to win his second major championship. Read our "From the Archives" story on Johnson after he won his first major in 2007... For many golf fans, the final round of the Masters Tournament in Augusta, Georgia, is the high holy day of professional sports. It's a chance to worship all things green and beautiful in the aptly named Cathedral of Golf. But for 2007 champion Zach Johnson, his stunning victory on April 8, was a chance to win the most prestigious of golf tournaments, the Masters, while worshiping the true Master... Click here to read the rest of our story on Zach Johnson from our July/August 2007 issue.

It takes guts to man the line of scrimmage, face mask to face mask with some of the nastiest 300-pound plus defensive linemen in the National Football League. (Of course, it's not so bad when you're 6-foot-6 and 278 pounds yourself.) It also takes guts to stand up for your convictions -- especially when you risk being misunderstood. Give Anthony Munoz an "A" for intestinal fortitude on both counts. The Cincinnati Bengals offensive tackle has been voted to the Pro Bowl seven times and has been recognized twice as the NFL's best offensive lineman. The 30-year-old Munoz has also developed the courage to take on moral issues. One that concerns him is the pervasiveness of pornography -- an issue he admits he has not always been sensitized toward...

When 16th-century English theologian Richard Hooker said, "Change is not made without inconvenience, even from worse to better," he didn't know anything about NBA traders. But he did know something that Portland Trail Blazer forward Buck Williams has learned: The road to success is not always smooth. Sometimes it takes you through New Jersey. Kyle Rote Jr. caught up with the Blazers' veteran to ask him how change has affect his life. Click here to read our story on the third pick in the 1981 draft, Buck Williams, from our March/April 1991 issue.

Dikembe Mutombo is a giant among men. At 7 feet 2 inches, the former Houston Rockets center towered above a majority of other players in the NBA. Regarded as one of the most prolific defensive players of all time, Mutombo has won the NBA Defensive Player of the Year Award four times, and in 2007 he surpassed Kareem Abdul-Jabbar as the second most prolific shot blocker in NBA history, behind Hakeem Olajuwon. Where the basketball superstar stands out most, however, is in the area of philanthropy. Called the “NBA's tallest humanitarian” by the New York Daily News, Mutombo has a heart as big as he is tall; a heart that reaches across the Atlantic Ocean to his homeland of Africa, the poorest continent in the world...

In only his fourth NBA season, A.C. Green has become the Los Angeles Lakers' leading rebounder. Although small for a power forward, A.C. is an iron man in the lane. He has endured on some of the toughest turf in sports, appearing in every regular season contest but three during his first three campaigns. A.C. (whose initials stand for the letters A and C) talks with Kyle Rote Jr. about crashing the boards with the big boys. KYLE: Let's talk about the toughness of the game itself. A lot of people have believed for many years that playing basketball in the NBA is physically the toughest of any of the professional sports. A.C.: That's true in that it's really demanding on your body. And it's pretty obvious to anyone who might watch... Read the rest of the story here.

Imagine having a job in which you get paid only if you do better than most of your fellow workers. And some weeks when you show up for work, your superiors make you try out just to see if you can even work that week. That's something like the high-pressure world of the professional golfers tour, where nothing is given to you free and the rewards are there only for those who can persevere. Kyle Rote Jr. Talks with PGA golfer Larry Mize to find out how he survives on tour... Mize won the Masters in 1987, when he chipped in from off the green at the 11th hole at Augusta in a playoff to win his only major title. Click here to read Sports Spectrum's interview with Mize from its January-February 1991 issue.

Let's go back to 1988. To the suburban community of Lake Bluff, Illinois, home of Lake Forest High School. Rob Pelinka is nearing the end of an outstanding prep basketball career. As a senior, the 6-foot, 6-inch guard is averaging 30 points and nearly 10 rebounds per game. Recruiters from around the country are knocking on his door, offering their championship promises on a daily basis. Coaches from Arizona, Stanford, Illinois, and Michigan are regulars at the Pelinka residence. That's not to mention the letters of interest from perennial basketball powerhouses North Carolina and Duke... Click here to read our 1993 feature on Rob Pelinka, who was the sixth man for the University of Michigan under the Fab Five and now represents NBA superstar Kobe Bryant.

Simply the best. John Wooden is, without question, the most successful, most respected, most everything collegiate basketball coach in the universe. Wooden passed away at age 99 on June 4, 2010, about fourth months from his 100th birthday...

Roger Thomas Staubach. Winner. What more can you say? Here’s a guy who had only one losing season in his lifetime. From Cincinnati’s Purcell High School to the New Mexico Military Institute to the Naval Academy to the Dallas Cowboys – his only sub .500 season was when injuries sank his senior season at Navy. And his winning percentage in the pros was a wave-worthy .746...

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